Audio tour

Audio tourKnossos Palace: the Labyrinth of the Minotaur

Only in English

2 sights

  1. Audio tour Summary
  2. Audio tour Summary

    Knossos, also known as Labyrinth, or Knossos Palace, is the largest Bronze Age archaeological site on Crete and probably the ceremonial and political center of the Minoan civilization and culture. The palace appears as a maze of workrooms, living spaces, and store rooms close to a central square. Detailed images of Cretan life in the late Bronze Age are provided by images on the walls of this palace.

    Knossos, the famous Minoan Palace, lies 5 kilometres southeast of Heraklion, in the valley of the river Kairatos. The river rises in Archanes, runs through Knossos and reaches the sea at Katsabas, the Minoan harbour of Knossos. In Minoan times the river flowed all year round and the surrounding hills were covered in oak and cypress trees, where today we see vines and olives. The pine trees inside the archaeological site were planted by Evans.

    Constant habitation for 9,000 years has brought about great changes to the natural environment, so it is hard to imagine what the Minoan landscape was like.

     

    LABRIS Audio guides

  3. 1 West Court
  4. 2 Arthur Evans' bust
  5. 3 Corridor of the Processions
  6. 4 South Entrance
  7. 5 Greek Temple and Ceramic Scrinium
  8. 6 Storage Rooms
  9. 7 Room of Copies
  10. 8 Throne Room
  11. 9 Central Court
  12. 10 Tripartite Shrine
  13. 11 Prince with lilies
  14. 12 Grand Staircase
  1. Audio tour Summary

    Knossos, also known as Labyrinth, or Knossos Palace, is the largest Bronze Age archaeological site on Crete and probably the ceremonial and political center of the Minoan civilization and culture. The palace appears as a maze of workrooms, living spaces, and store rooms close to a central square. Detailed images of Cretan life in the late Bronze Age are provided by images on the walls of this palace.

    Knossos, the famous Minoan Palace, lies 5 kilometres southeast of Heraklion, in the valley of the river Kairatos. The river rises in Archanes, runs through Knossos and reaches the sea at Katsabas, the Minoan harbour of Knossos. In Minoan times the river flowed all year round and the surrounding hills were covered in oak and cypress trees, where today we see vines and olives. The pine trees inside the archaeological site were planted by Evans.

    Constant habitation for 9,000 years has brought about great changes to the natural environment, so it is hard to imagine what the Minoan landscape was like.

     

    LABRIS Audio guides

Reviews

22 reviews

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  • Traveler

    5 out of 5 rating 06-30-2021

    Very good & interesting tour, thanks a lot. Slow pace in the beginning (you’re walking circles around the first two points listening the guide), interesting facts and consistent story I’d ask to add more indications on direction, so you don’t need to take your phone out to check the map Knossos should not be visited without a guide, so this audio assistant is very useful

  • José

    5 out of 5 rating 10-16-2020

    Excellent tour great info and easy to follow, unfortunately some sections were closed not sure if due to covid or just because, also the app reset when I open the camera to take pictures

  • Traveler

    5 out of 5 rating 09-14-2020

    Great alternative to the guides that hunt for you at the entrance of Knossos (and also ask for some crazy prices)! I'd recommend this any day.

  • Martin

    4 out of 5 rating 09-13-2019

    I liked the content, but there could have been more directions in the audio, so you don't have to look around do much to find what he is talking about.

  • Caroline

    5 out of 5 rating 08-14-2019

    Love the concept of this app, and the content of this tour in particular. Perfect for enjoying Knossos hands free with a personal cretan guide (and being able to avoid the crowds around the written plaques). Was at times a bit buggy on picking up the GPS and a little long-winded on the Arthur Evans point, but all in all, well worth it.